Fort Gibson to Hulbert

One of our favorite pavement rides in Oklahoma is a little known road from Fort Gibson, north along the Neosho River to the Fort Gibson dam, then northeast along county roads to Hulbert. This is a winding, scenic 21 mile ride that is always fun and seldom has any traffic. I have ridden this route many times on a variety of motorcycles ranging from crotch rockets to cruisers to a dual sport bike. The pavement is rough in some places with possible gravel in the corners, but overall this is a great ride with lots of twisty corners and epic scenery, especially in the summer and fall.

On the way northwest out of Fort Gibson you stop by the historic army fort from the 1800’s. This is a well-preserved fort that is maintained by the State of Oklahoma. If you have never been there be sure and take a couple of hours and tour the fort. You can see how soldiers lived on the Oklahoma frontier.

Leaving the fort, head north along the east bank of the Neosho River to the Fort Gibson Lake dam. This is a modern hydroelectric dam that generates power for PSO. You can stop and watch the fishermen and take pictures of this huge structure.

Instead of crossing the dam, backtrack just a bit and head north and east along a county road. Here you wind through backroads and along the shore of Fort Gibson eventually arriving in Hulbert. Watch for deer, gravel and sand in the road. During especially heavy rains the road can be flooded and closed. There are several state parks you can stop at for lunch and enjoy the sunshine and view. Not much is available in Hulbert in regards to food, but Sequoyah State Park is nearby.

The roads are all paved and passable by any motorcycle, although the ride can be bumpy in places. Watch for loose gravel in the corners.

The roads are all paved and passable by any motorcycle, although the ride can be bumpy in places. Watch for loose gravel in the corners.

Bill Dragoo riding his BMW GS along the shores of Fort Gibson Lake.

Bill Dragoo riding his BMW GS along the shores of Fort Gibson Lake.

A typical bunkhouse at Fort Gibson.

A typical bunkhouse at Fort Gibson.

Can you imagine living life on the frontier as an Army soldier?

Can you imagine living life on the frontier as an Army soldier?

Bill Dragoo takes his usual afternoon motorcycling nap in the shade of an oak tree at Fort Gibson.

Bill Dragoo takes his usual afternoon motorcycling nap in the shade of an oak tree at Fort Gibson.

This fireplace is all that is left of one bunkhouse.

This fireplace is all that is left of one bunkhouse.

The Army built Fort Gibson to protect the Indians who were moved along the Trail of Tears into the area.

The Army built Fort Gibson to protect the Indians who were moved along the Trail of Tears into the area.

Several cabins and bunkhouses are scattered across historic Fort Gibson.

Several cabins and bunkhouses are scattered across historic Fort Gibson.

Be sure and stop at the historic Fort Gibson. Plan to spend an hour or more touring this great historic site.

Be sure and stop at the historic Fort Gibson. Plan to spend an hour or more touring this great historic site.

About James Pratt

I am an Oklahoma based writer, photographer, videographer and adventurer. I love telling stories about people. A motorcycle is my preferred means of travel, and I have over 5,000 hours piloting small airplanes.

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