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“Your bike is ready.”

I got a call today about 3 hours after dropping off my 2008 BMW R1200GS Adventure at Eurotek in OKC for some recall and extended warranty work. When I saw the my caller ID I assumed they were calling with some type of question about maintenance.

“Did I hear you right? My bike is ready? Are you sure you have the right person? I just dropped it off.”

“Yep, we got it all done. You can stop by any time and pick it up.”

“I haven’t even left town yet. I will be right over.”

I thought I must have been in a time warp or something. Same day service from a motorcycle dealer? I quickly looked out the window of my truck to make sure there wasn’t a sun spot, or make sure Aston Kutcher wasn’t around to Punk me.

You see, I am used to the service at BMW of OKC from many years ago. I bought my first GS there in 2002 and by 2003 I learned that one doesn’t take one’s bike to the BMW store if you wanted to ride it anytime in the next two months. Instead I learned to work on my bikes myself so that I could actually get some riding time in during the summer. I learned to do tire changes, oil changes, valve adjustments, all the routine maintenance items. If not my bike would be gone for a month or two during riding season, even if I called well ahead of time, scheduled an appointment, brought the bike in the day I said I would bring it in – it would still sit at the BMW shop for 4 weeks before they even looked at it.

Finally a BMW dealer in OKC that provides outstanding service and does what they say they will do. Refreshing.
Finally a BMW dealer in OKC that provides outstanding service and does what they say they will do. Refreshing.

I had been putting off getting this recall and extended warranty work done on my R1200GS because I figured my bike would disappear into the maw of the bike shop and I wouldn’t see it again until months later. I finally broke down and called the new BMW dealer in OKC, Eurotek – now a BMW, Ducati, and Triumph dealer in OKC.

“Hey, I got a 2008 BMW R1200GSA that has some recall work needed. Can you guys do that for me?”

“What is your VIN number.” I gave them that info.

“We don’t have all the parts in but we will order the parts and give you call when they get in and schedule the work.”

Yea, yea I thought. SURE you will give me a call. I made a mental note to call Eurotek back in a couple of weeks to see if they got the parts in. Nobody calls you back like they say they will, right?

Lo and behold, I got a call two days later. “We have your parts in. When would you like to bring your bike in?”

“Huh? My name is James Pratt. Are you sure you are calling the correct number? I don’t own a Ferrari or Bentley.”

“Yes sir. This is Eurotek. You have a BMW R1200GS Adventure right?”

Yep, they had the correct person. We scheduled a time for the following week and I brought it in exactly when we agreed. Dropped my bike off on a cold, wet, rainy February day. I trailered the bike to the shop because I figured I would need to drop it off and then pick it up a few weeks later when it was done. I loaded up my Aprilia 280 Climber observed trials bike beside the big GS and after dropping off my Beemer, I drove on down to Tombo Racing to have my racer/bike builder friend Jimmy Cook weld up the aluminum frame. Afterwards I hung around and chatted with owner Tommy Bolton, loaded up my Aprilia, ran another errand in Midwest City, and as I was leaving MWC for home in Edmond I got the call from Eurotek – “your bike is ready.”

Tombo Racing's Jimmy Cook welding the aluminum frame on my Aprilia 280 Climber observed trials motorcycle.
Tombo Racing’s Jimmy Cook welding the aluminum frame on my Aprilia 280 Climber observed trials motorcycle.

I just knew two planets had slammed together, or one of these Oklahoma earthquakes had rattled someone’s brain, or maybe my friend and adventure rider guru Bill Dragoo was pulling my leg. Sure enough, I drove back over to Eurotek and there was my GS, all ready to go and running like a top. They replaced the fuel pump, fuel gage strip, did some adjustment on the clutch cable, and replaced some type of flange in the rear hub assembly. All at no cost to me, paid for my BMW Motorrad.

Dang. Double dang. These guys did what they said they would do. What a novel concept!

I normally don’t write a post about a motorcycle shop, but I normally don’t get unbelievable service like this either. People actually call me back? Exceed my expectations? Communicate clearly and do what they say they are going to do? Is this an alternate dimension?

If you are looking for a BMW, Ducati or Triumph, man, you will have to look far and wide to find a better dealer than Eurotek OKC. I am very, very pleasantly surprised that we have an A#1 top notch BMW dealer in OKC now. It is about time.

A Duc in the rain. This Ducati Diablo was sitting outside on a cold, rainy February day. Poor Duc.
A Duc in the rain. This Ducati Diablo was sitting outside on a cold, rainy February day. Poor Duc.

This story originally ran in the January 2009 Ride Oklahoma.

The name Ducati evokes emotions in most motorcyclists. Like Harley Davidson, Ducati has a devoted group of fans that admire and adore the brand. It is more than just a brand of bikes – it is a lifestyle. For Ducati, that lifestyle is synonymous with speed.

Owned by Gerald Tims of Performance Cycle, you can often see this unique and very rare motorcycle at the Seaba Station Motorcycle Museum in Warwick, Oklahoma.
Owned by Gerald Tims of Performance Cycle, you can often see this unique and very rare motorcycle at the Seaba Station Motorcycle Museum in Warwick, Oklahoma.

Featured this month on the cover of Ride Oklahoma is Gerald Tims’ 1967 Ducati Mach 1/S at Hallett Raceway. This pristine example of the brand is quite unique and rare. “It is the most rare and valuable motorcycle I own” says Gerald Tims, owner of Performance Cycle in Bethany. “It was built specifically for racing and only a few exist today that I know of.” And Gerald should know. He owns over 100 old, rare motorcycles that are stored upstairs at his dealership and will soon be on display at his Seeba Station on Highway 66 east of Wellston.

Ducati handbill for the Mach 1/S
Ducati handbill for the Mach 1/S

This Formula III Ducati 250 was one of only a dozen made and imported by Berliner Motor Company (the U.S. importer for Ducati at the time) for racing purposes only. Not much is known about these bikes, since they were hand built and designed specifically for racing. Only 50 were made worldwide. The gears are all straight cut and narrowed for racing purposes. The external oil lines to and from the head are unique to the FIII’s. The engine produced 35 HP at 9,000 RPM – unheard of for the day – and powered this light motorcycle to approximately 135 mph.

This particular FIII was restored in 1973 using all of the original parts and tires were removed before racing. This was the last of the springhead racers. Estimated value is over $60,000. Not bad for a single cylinder, hand built racebike!

Ducati 250cc Mach 1/S

Ducati 250cc Mach 1/S

This motor was built prior to desmo valve actuation. It was a sand-cast motor built just for racing and featured external oil lines.
This motor was built prior to desmo valve actuation. It was a sand-cast motor built just for racing and featured external oil lines.
This particular Ducati was one of only 10 units imported to the USA specifically for racing.
This particular Ducati was one of only 10 units imported to the USA specifically for racing.

Unfortunately the depressed economy has hit hard here in Oklahoma.  We received this email from Ryan Tupps at Ducati/BMW of OKC.

December 8, 2011

Dear Customers,

We would like to thank each and every one of you for taking the time to visit us over the past ten years.  However, we have made the decision to close the store and explore other ventures.  As I write this, my only regret is that I made my days too busy with business and didn’t stop and talk to you, our customer, on the showroom floor more often.  The friendships that I have made in my time at the dealership are some of the most meaningful in my life.  It has been the greatest honor, and the most fun thing in my life, to be able to represent the Ducati brand.  Ducati has been, and always will be, a true love in my heart.  Having gotten to meet the people who work at every level of the company, my passion has grown even more.  I would like to thank each of them for the opportunity they gave me with this dealership.

I have also been fortunate to work with people I truly believe are world class salespeople, parts gurus, and technicians, and I only wish I would have learned more from them.  I truly feel that the employees at the shop are my family and we will always continue that friendship.  Thanks to you all for your hard work these past ten years – our dream was your dream too, and we could not thank you more.

This truly is a time of fantastic change, as Jenn and I are expecting our first child in the Spring.  We are both excitedly awaiting this new adventure!  Careerwise, it seems uncertain. But lately I have been asked, “What did you always want to do when you were a kid?” So I’m sorry Mr. Hamilton, but today I begin my unbridled efforts to become McLaren’s top Formula 1 driver!

Sincerely yours,

Ryan Tupps

Ride Oklahoma attended the premier of Two Wheel Oklahoma television show at the Chesapeake Boathouse in downtown Oklahoma City on Friday night, March 19. The day was made for spring riding, with temperatures near 70 degrees and little wind. A winter storm was bearing down on Oklahoma, and a cold front passed through the area around 8:00 pm bringing rain and much colder temperatures. A few intrepid riders (including the author) ended up riding home in a bit of rain, but luckily I had brought along rain gear and a heated vest so it was actually a pleasant ride home.

The Two Wheel Oklahoma premier at the Chesapeak Boathouse was the first time for Oklahomans to see the new Ducati Multistrada 1200

The Two Wheel Oklahoma TV show is produced locally by Brad Mathison and Rex Brown from Tulsa. Originally the pair had been filming various video clips as they traveled around Oklahoma on their motorcycles for their web site Places to Ride. “We got a wild idea to produce the show for television” says Brown. “We quickly found out we didn’t have the technical skills or time to create a show with the production values we needed.”

Brad Mathison & Rex Brown speak to the crowd
The Chesapeake Boathouse offered a cool atmosphere for the premier

“One day I was watching a local TV show called ‘Homescapes’ and noticed it was produced locally. I called the Retrospect Productions, the company that produced Homescapes, and talked to them about this idea I had. They agreed to produce our pilot episode on spec for the local PBS station” explain Mathison.

After a successful pilot show on the Tulsa PBS stations, Two Wheel Oklahoma talked to OETA about a statewide show. The show is now on on Sunday mornings at 8:30 on OETA.

The Two Wheel Oklahoma crew has much higher goals, however. “We want to go national” says Mathison. “Two Wheel America is our next goal.”
“We think a travel show that uses motorcycles to explore places that are truly off the beaten path is something that would go over well nationally” adds Brown. “Today Oklahoma, tomorrow the world!”

Ducati of Oklahoma provided the eye candy for the event

The beautiful Jodi Fritts tries on a Ducati Monster for size.

In support of Two Wheel Oklahoma’s efforts, the great folks at Ducati of Oklahoma brought some eye candy for the show – the new Ducati Multistrada 1200 made its first showing in Oklahoma at the event. This beautiful black example of Italian adventure touring turned heads and brought plenty of Ducatista’s to the event. Around 60 people enjoyed drinks, the beautiful sunset along the Oklahoma River, some sexy Ducati motorcycles and lovely female models, music and great food. The atmosphere at the Chesapeake Boathouse was perfect for this cool event. Riding home in a light rain was a small price to pay for a great time!

by Brian Hopkins


Then why do I find myself wanting one?
Word is, the new Multistrada 1200 will be priced at about $15 grand … comparable to the GS. The videos below are intriguing, to say the least, and I admit that the looks are growing on me. Four riding modes: sport, touring, enduro, and urban (explained in the video). 150 hp. Throttle by wire. Keyless ignition. ABS. Traction control. Electronically adjustable suspension. Servo-actuated (slipper?) clutch. An electronic dash that’ll tell you everything from your gear position to your chances of getting laid at bike night. And I think it weighs less than my F650GS Dakar. Add to that a face that only a mother could love and, well … the adventure bike melting pot just got a little sweeter now didn’t it?

(Photos courtesy of Bikes in the Fast Lane.)